08 October 2008

A surge in Indian brides causes Australian migration to rise

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The number of Indian brides migrating to Australia under the sponsorship migration programme has increased dramatically over the past decade, making Indians one of the largest and fastest growing Australian migration groups in the world, reports NDTV.com.

According to the news provider, last year nearly 3,000 Indian brides migrated to Australia under the sponsorship program.  The Australian Spouse, Fiancée and Partner visa allows would-be migrants who are married to, engaged to, or committed to an Australian citizen or permanent resident to obtain an Australian Spouse visa

The increase in Indian brides migrating to Australia over the past 11 years has been six-fold, when in 1997 only 434 Indian brides and 149 Indian husbands were sponsored by Australian residents or citizens.  The number of spousal visas has also risen from 25,500 in 1997 to 39,931 this year. 

"This is very substantial growth and illustrates the dynamics of the programme, which has recently been boosted by the Labour government largely to keep a lid on the price of labour," Bob Birrell, an immigration expert and professor at Monash University in Melbourne, told The Australian newspaper.

"There is a lot of interest in leaving India and an Indian-born person with Australian permanent residence who is looking for a spouse is in a favourable situation in selecting an attractive partner," he added.

India joins New Zealand and the United Kingdom for being the largest skilled migrant groups in Australia.

The Australian Visa Bureau is an independent consulting company specialising in helping people apply for an Australia visa.

Article by Jessica Bird, Australian Visa Bureau.

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